1925 Phantom I Barker 10EX

The experimental 1925 Phantom I Barker 10EX help set what would become some of the marque’s most enduring standards.

Before Rolls-Royce began creating the coachworks for its rolling chassis, it was still able to develop a distinct visual language by defining specific design cues. These included the establishment of the elongated hood and a vehicle height that was to be no greater than that of two stacked tires. And it was the experimental 1925 Phantom I Barker 10EX that helped set what would become some of the marque’s most enduring standards.

“The 10EX is truly sleek; it telegraphs motion," says Austin. “It is what Sir Henry Royce used to test out new componentry and new spring and suspension arrangements in order to create a sportier and more dynamic car."

According to Taylor, the car not only foreshadows the marque’s future success but also captures the temper of the time. “Elegant proportions and rakish simplicity are evident in this early Royce experimental chassis that features the work of coachbuilder Barker of London," he explains. “And the daring cream-and-blue colour combination says much about the free spirit of the 1920s."

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Published November 30, 2017
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