Hoshinoya Bali merges Japanese tranquillity with Balinese history

an ancient treasure

A web of waterways dating back to the ninth century weave through Ubud’s terraced rice paddies and verdant mountains, inextricably linking the modern tourist hub to its ancient past. The sacred canals are part of a water temple network recognised as a cultural landscape by UNESCO. Opened in January, Hoshinoya Bali was built around the canals, offering guests a first-hand look at the culturally significant site.

Thirty thatched-roof villas with indoor-outdoor spaces are divided into three distinct categories, each sure to provide rest and rejuvenation for visitors. Conveniently located near the pools, the residences at Villa Bulan showcase poolside living spaces as well as second-story bedrooms that open to serene garden terraces. Overlooking the jungle, the single-story, family-friendly Villa Jalak properties are outfitted with living areas, balconies, and easy access to onsite amenities. Ideal for lengthy stays and groups of up to four, the Villa Soka abodes include open-concept bedrooms and studies as well as first-floor living rooms that protrude over the pool. The villas are all connected via a pool area that allows guests to seamlessly manoeuvre to and from the water.

While at the resort, guests can dine on Balinese cuisine made by executive chef Makoto Miyamaguchi or undergo ancient treatments at the spa. A slew of sky-high gazebos overlook the verdant jungle, serving as ideal spaces for meditation sessions or leisurely lounges. The onsite library is stocked with books, computers, and newspapers, and a nearby terrace can accommodate yoga classes.

Hoshinoya Bali 

 

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Published June 10, 2017
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